Last edited by Sharg
Wednesday, February 5, 2020 | History

9 edition of Vermeer"s Hat found in the catalog.

Vermeer"s Hat

The Seventeenth Century and the Dawn of the Global World

by Timothy Brook

  • 347 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Bloomsbury Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • 17th Century Art,
  • History Of Civilization And Culture (General),
  • History,
  • History - General History,
  • History: World,
  • History - Baroque & Rococo,
  • Modern - 17th Century,
  • History / General,
  • World - General,
  • 17th century,
  • Civilization, Modern,
  • Culture and globalization

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages288
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL12443752M
    ISBN 101596914440
    ISBN 109781596914445

    The Netherlands, that small but vigorous nation, played a seminal role in the process, and its merchants grew rich. In this way, he created a world more perfect than any he had witnessed. Our tasks as observers are partly to interpret as well as respond, as well as merely see. Once Western trade opened up that closed realm, merchants found ingenious ways to despoil it: the English encouraged the Chinese addiction to opium, which helped reverse the deficit racked up by their bulk-buying of tea. For example, in chapter 2, a grand felt hat appearing in Vermeer's painting Officer and Laughing Girl leads the author to turn to the transcontinental patterns of fur trade. Even after Vermeer's supposed financial breakdown following the so-called rampjaar year of disaster inhe continued to employ natural ultramarine generously, such as in Lady Seated at a Virginal.

    Since no economic signs are inscribed on the wall, he says no more. But this is only a starting point for a truly global tour. Brook starts the story setting out in the city of Delft in the Netherlands. It became one of the most powerful companies for business enterprises in the seventeenth century.

    One aspect of his meticulous painting technique was Vermeer's choice of pigments. His family obligations with so many children may have taken up much of his time, as would acting as both an art-dealer and inn-keeper in running the family businesses. Canadian Sinologist Timothy Brook discovered Vermeer when he fell off his bicycle in Delft during a university vacation. Professor Philip Steadman published the book Vermeer's Camera: Uncovering the Truth behind the Masterpieces in which specifically claimed that Vermeer had used a camera obscura to create his paintings. The woman who weighs silver does so in front of a painting that shows the Last Judgment, a preview of God's strict accountancy in the next life. Our tasks as observers are partly to interpret as well as respond, as well as merely see.


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Vermeers Hat book

InReijnier married Digna Baltus. Through every painting, it led to a door that caused a discussion point of the history of the world.

Vermeer's Hat : The seventeenth century and the dawn of the global world

The floppy hat worn by a visiting cavalier in one painting prompts him to think about the beavers that were skinned to make felt, which leads to Vermeers Hat book account of the fur trade in eastern Canada. He spent the next five years testing his theory by attempting to re-create The Music Lesson himself using these tools, a process captured in the documentary film Tim's Vermeer.

It was here, on the literally named Money mountain, that a river of silver and tobacco from South America was swapped for the very thing that came to stand for China - china itself. Practically all of his surviving works belong to this period, usually domestic interiors with one or two figures lit by a window on the left.

Steadman noted that many of Vermeer's paintings had been painted in the same room, and he found six of his paintings that are precisely the right size if they had been painted from inside a camera obscura in the room's back wall. Yet the author also investigates other important sides of the trans-Pacific silver trade such as the role of public and private agents, or the impact of the closing of Japan on commodity flows and, as a consequence, on regional economies.

He states that tobacco started in Europe due to Portuguese sailors, and from there it spread and soon became was in high demand. The widow sold two more paintings to Hendrick van Buyten to pay off a substantial debt.

This book is an easy read, with not a lot of hard vocabulary to have to understand as well. Dou may have influenced Pieter de Hooch and Gabriel Metsutoo. A start was made on this kind of work a decade or so ago with all those neat little books on a single commodity - spice, coffee and so on.

But its rich texture makes it a symbol of painting, a text compiled from strokes and scratches that are as eloquent as words. Brook likens each work of art to a door and by entering it, we can be transported around a rapidly expanding world; a seemingly simple object — a felt hat, a china dish, a fishing vessel — can tell us not just about the interior depicted but point to the complicated chain of links that has seen key commodities that we now take for granted become common currency around the world.

Brook's point, really, is that while most of the figures in the paintings of the Dutch golden age look as if they have never strayed more than a day or two from Delft, the material world through which they move is stuffed with hats, pots, wine, slaves and carpets that have been gusted around the world by the twin demands of trade and war.

And they do it all washed in a calm, clear light that speaks of stillness and an enduring noonday moment. This theory remains disputed. Chinese people thought that tobacco had medicinal purposes, while Native Americans thought that tobacco connected you to a supernatural world.

Its approach is highly original; its style is lucid and clear; its scholarship is nothing less than phenomenal. The mood of these exchanges, though, was far from the buffed-up smoothness that one might expect.

Because space on the globe is circular, all these associative routes lead to China, which is Brook's academic speciality. Similarly, a porcelain dish in another Vermeer painting serves as a point of departure for a chapter dealing with European imports of porcelain from China.

Also, you jump around a little in the body section. Everything that exists, or has ever existed, every idea that can be thought about, every datum that is true—every dharma, in the language of Indian philosophy—is a pearl in Indra's net.

A time when every picture told a story

Our tasks as observers are partly to interpret as well as respond, as well as merely see. A local patron named Pieter van Ruijven had purchased much of his output, which reduced the possibility of his fame spreading.

This painting is one of the only outdoor scenes Vermeer had painted that is still in existence. Han van Meegeren was a 20th-century Dutch painter who worked in the classical tradition.

All of these windows Brook opens show the interchanging ideas, products, and climate. Vermeer also charged higher than average prices for his work, most of which were purchased by an unknown collector.

The Dutch, in turn, derived their ideas of what Chinese culture was like from these artefacts and then added a few wayward touches of their own.

Falcoanother proponent of the theory.The eponymous chapter, perhaps the book’s strongest, uses Vermeer’s Officer and Laughing Girl to describe and analyze the North American beaver trade. The officer sports a large hat made of felt, which was manufactured from the beaver’s atlasbowling.com: Timothy Brook.

However much light appears to flood into Vermeer's interiors, the corridors explored by Brook are shadowed by the risk of instant death.

By the time we are half way through, we have encountered. Aug 12,  · Buy Vermeer's Hat: The Seventeenth Century and the Dawn of the Global World Main by Timothy Brook (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.4/5(49). Jan 01,  · Every once in a while, a book comes along that really surprises me with its excellence - Vermeer's Hat is one of those books.

What this book is is a look into the seventeenth century, but as a hook, the book uses eight seventeenth century works of art, that each tells us something about the era in which it was atlasbowling.com by: Jan 02,  · About Vermeer's Hat.

In this critical darling Vermeer's captivating and enigmatic paintings become windows that reveal how daily life and thought-from Delft to Beijing--were transformed in the 17th century, when the world first became global.

A Vermeer painting shows a military officer in a Dutch sitting room, talking to a laughing girl.

Vermeer's Hat

Vermeer's Hat, the cover image on the book is there and is cross listed with another image in which the same map atlasbowling.com uses the art of Johannes Vermeer to demonstrate the growth in commerce during the 's by focusing on items that appear in the images.